Bio





Our body based practice, our dances, our music, our objects are all nervous. We want to push them to be dangerously lively - disruptive. On the verge of breaking. Objects that are about to disappear: tapes, anecdotes from places that have been burnt to the ground, dances invented by children when they were bored on the side of the road, forests that may never come back. No nostalgia here -  but  a way to engage with the figure of the stranger, through it's many aspects: eco-poesis of the dead, the poet, the foreigner, the healer, the gatherer, the monster, the befriended.


These last years of experimentation have been centered around two practices:
- A research on sound as a dancing body - primarily focusing on the tension between a musical gesture and raw sound material, generated by nervousness and necessity; using editing techniques such as cut ups, exposure, shadowing and reporting them to real time sound making.
- In parallel I have been exploring a performing and installation practice placed between poetry and politics, using science/fiction and philosophical texts in order to provide hospitality to the weird and playfulness with the future. My work is in resonance with the Cascando triad: “of knowing, not knowing, pretending."

Bio:
Jassem Hindi was born in Saudi Arabia and studied philosophy at the Sorbonne in Paris.
Performer, sound maker, teacher, writer, his work extends internationally, involving mostly politically engaged work and the study of strange objects.

As a performer and as a maker he participates to the construction of political poems, using a hybrid technique made out of broken body practices, broken objects practices, broken sound practices.
As a musician, he is using mainly diverted machines, lo-fi field recordings, feedbacks, in the spirit of experimental music (Graham Lambkin, Andrea Neumann, Kevin Drumm, Jason Lescalleet) influenced by doom, video editing techniques and older masters in the likes of Alvin Lucier, Parmegiani or Bellini.
In 2016 he has participated in the writing, performing and sound making of collaborative / shared authorship pieces: Murder Dance (last dates: Cork, Helsinki), future friend/ships (last dates: Hamburg, New York), Turbulence (last dates:Oslo, Berlin) and Zombies (last dates: Dublin, San Francisco)
He also recently made a sound installation for Angela Schubot's Körper ohne Macht (HAU Berlin) 

This year, among others, he collaborated with Keith Hennessy, Ida Larsen, Marie-Louise Stentebjerg, Ruairi Donovan, Angela Schubot, Hana Erdman, Rani Nair, Jeremy Wade and Mia Habib. He is the recipient of several grants and residency programs along with his partners, supported by Norway, Sweden, Germany, France, USA and a couple of curators - among which the Ystad Arts Museum. He is a Sweet and Tender collaborator.
As a sound maker, he is part of the experimental scene, in all its diversity and hybrid art practices. His most recent sound collaborators in the past year are Axel Dörner, Olivier di Placido, Basile Ferriot, Magda Mayas, Tony Buck, Hana Lee Erdman, Jakob Riis, Martin & Maria Küchen. In the spirit of the improvised music scene he has played in in situ concerts with a wide range of musicians in and from various continents.

He also teaches a variety of workshops about sound, performance and theory.

Details on my practice:
My work is haunted by other voices: I use, edit, corrupt and celebrate. I am not a musician, nor a dancer, nor a visual artist. There should always be something I'm missing in my practice. I believe that any virtuoso act is an act of foreclosure, and I am much more interested in unstable systems, offering space for other things to happen, and thus always flirting with failure.
In my work with dance, I also thrive to manifest sound as a dancing body and not as a simple ornament to frame dance. It is a simple political and poetical position which supports the idea that the practice of sound, even if it can be conceptualized - or read through the filter of emotions - is also a silent practice - its thickness, just like the one of a body, remains opaque. This opacity is where I believe a dancer and a sound can meet.